Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/68867
Title: Social cognition and work performance of persons with schizophrenia in a Chinese population
Authors: Lo, P
Siu, AMH 
Keywords: Emotion perception
Theory-of-mind
Attributional style
Vocational
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: IOS Press
Source: Work, 2015, v. 50, no. 4, p. 629-636 How to cite?
Journal: Work 
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Social-cognitive deficits have a significant impact on the community and vocational functioning of persons with schizophrenia.
OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the relationship between social-cognitive abilities and vocational functioning in a Chinese population.
METHOD: We recruited 30 outpatients with schizophrenia to participate. We administered the Chinese Social Cognition and Screening Questionnaire (C-SCSQ) to assess Theory of Mind (ToM), attributional bias, and neurocognition; the Facial Expression Identification Test (FEIT) to assess emotion perception (EP) ability, and the Chinese Work Personality Profile (CWPP) to assess work performance in a simulated work setting.
RESULTS: ToM showed a significant negative correlation with attributional bias. The neurocognitive measure displayed a significant positive correlation with ToM and EP. The structural equation model was a good fit to the data (CFI=0.91, RMSEA=0.12), and showed that social-cognitive abilities had a significant impact (−0.41) on work performance. Of the four social-cognitive domains, ToM and paranoid attributional style (PAS) contributed significantly to variations in work performance. These results support the theory that social-cognitive abilities have an impact on work performance. ToM has a positive impact whereas PAS has an adverse effect.
CONCLUSION: Persons with schizophrenia present specific deficits in their social-cognitive abilities, which have significant impact on their work performance and employability.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/68867
ISSN: 1051-9815
EISSN: 1875-9270
DOI: 10.3233/WOR-141828
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