Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/90298
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dc.contributorEnglish Language Centreen_US
dc.creatorKohnke, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-10T08:01:11Z-
dc.date.available2021-06-10T08:01:11Z-
dc.identifier.issn2472-5749en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10397/90298-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOnline Learning Consortiumen_US
dc.rightsCopyright (c) 2021 Lucas Kohnkeen_US
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)en_US
dc.rightsThe following publication Kohnke, L. (2021). Professional development and ICT: English language teachers’ voices. Online Learning, 25(2), 36-53 is available at https://doi.org/10.24059/olj.v25i2.2228en_US
dc.subjectEnglish language tertiary teachersen_US
dc.subjectProfessional developmenten_US
dc.subjectInformation communication technologyen_US
dc.subjectHong Kongen_US
dc.titleProfessional development and ICT : English language teachers’ voicesen_US
dc.typeJournal/Magazine Articleen_US
dc.identifier.spage36en_US
dc.identifier.epage53en_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.24059/olj.v25i2.2228en_US
dcterms.abstractWhile technology use is becoming increasingly common in education, teachers remain reluctant to use technology and hesitant on how best to incorporate it into their teaching and practice. There is a strong demand from institutions for English language teachers to cope with the changing landscape of teaching in the twenty-first century. This explorative study investigated Hong Kong tertiary teachers’ beliefs on continuing professional development activities to enhance their teaching. The study had a two-phase research design, with an initial questionnaire (N = 58) followed by semi-structured interviews (N = 12) to unpack the participants’ hidden voices. The findings illustrated that most teachers are enthusiastic about professional development activities, though there is a misalignment between what universities value and reward and what teachers see as most beneficial for enhancing their teaching practices. The results suggested that professional development activities should focus on sharing good teaching practices (e.g., informal chats, mentoring) within universities rather than rewarding attending conferences and nonintegrated workshops.en_US
dcterms.accessRightsopen accessen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationOnline learning (Newburyport), 2021, v. 25, no. 2, p. 36-53en_US
dcterms.isPartOfOnline learning (Newburyport)en_US
dcterms.issued2021-
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85108138305-
dc.identifier.eissn2472-5730en_US
dc.description.validate202106 bcvcen_US
dc.description.oaVersion of Recorden_US
dc.identifier.FolderNumbera0916-n02-
dc.description.fundingSourceSelf-fundeden_US
dc.description.pubStatusPublisheden_US
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