Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/90026
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributorDepartment of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.creatorLi, Gen_US
dc.creatorYu, Yen_US
dc.creatorHuang, Ben_US
dc.creatorChen, Pen_US
dc.creatorShao, Zen_US
dc.creatorAn, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-18T08:20:19Z-
dc.date.available2021-05-18T08:20:19Z-
dc.identifier.issn0363-907Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10397/90026-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.subjectActive nitrogen dopantsen_US
dc.subjectAdsorption-type carbon materialsen_US
dc.subjectChemisorptionen_US
dc.subjectPhysisorptionen_US
dc.subjectSodium storageen_US
dc.subjectSpecific surface areaen_US
dc.titleRevealing the sodium-storage performance enhancement of adsorption-type carbon materials after ammonia treatment : active nitrogen dopants or specific surface area?en_US
dc.typeJournal/Magazine Articleen_US
dc.identifier.spage7447en_US
dc.identifier.epage7456en_US
dc.identifier.volume45en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/er.6327en_US
dcterms.abstractAdsorption-type carbon materials are promising candidates for fast sodium-ion storage via surface physisorption or chemisorption of sodium ions. Post-treatment of carbon such as ammonia can simultaneously strengthen both adsorption effects by increasing the specific surface area for physisorption, and by introducing active nitrogen dopants for chemisorption. Which factor, however, the increment of specific surface area or the introduction of active nitrogen dopants, predominantly contributes to sodium-storage capacity increment, remains a question. Answering this question is of great importance for understanding the sodium storage mechanism of adsorption-type carbon materials and thereby optimizing their sodium storage capabilities. In this work, pristine carbon is thermally treated in ammonia at temperatures from 600 to 1200°C, resulting in a simultaneous increase of specific surface area (8.6-1155 m2 g−1) and active nitrogen dopants (0.75-6.47 wt%). Correlations between sodium storage capacity and specific surface area/active nitrogen dopants are established. It is found that as the post-treatment temperature increases, the capacity increment is contributed first by sodium physisorption on active surface, and then by sodium chemisorption on nitrogen dopants. Our findings enrich the mechanistic understanding of sodium storage in adsorption-type carbon materials, which may guide the rational designs of carbon materials for high-rate sodium-based energy storage systems.en_US
dcterms.accessRightsembargoed accessen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationInternational journal of energy research, Apr. 2021, v. 45, no. 5, p. 7447-7456en_US
dcterms.isPartOfInternational journal of energy researchen_US
dcterms.issued2021-04-
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85097629086-
dc.description.validate202105 bchyen_US
dc.description.oaNot applicableen_US
dc.identifier.FolderNumbera0673-n18-
dc.description.fundingSourceRGCen_US
dc.description.fundingTextRGC Ref. No. 15222018en_US
dc.description.pubStatusPublisheden_US
dc.date.embargo2022-04-30en_US
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article
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Embargo End Date 2022-04-30
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