Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/89702
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dc.contributorSchool of Hotel and Tourism Managementen_US
dc.creatorGuzzo, RFen_US
dc.creatorWang, Xen_US
dc.creatorAbbott, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-05T04:56:51Z-
dc.date.available2021-05-05T04:56:51Z-
dc.identifier.issn1938-9655en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10397/89702-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_US
dc.rightsThis is the accepted version of the publication Guzzo RF, Wang X, Abbott J. Corporate Social Responsibility and Individual Outcomes: The Mediating Role of Gratitude and Compassion at Work. Cornell Hospitality Quarterly. December 2020. Copyright © 2020 (The Author(s)). DOI: 10.1177/1938965520981069en_US
dc.subjectCompassionen_US
dc.subjectCorporate social responsibilityen_US
dc.subjectGratitudeen_US
dc.subjectWell-beingen_US
dc.titleCorporate social responsibility and individual outcomes : the mediating role of gratitude and compassion at worken_US
dc.typeJournal/Magazine Articleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1938965520981069en_US
dcterms.abstractCorporate social responsibility (CSR) policies and activities are aimed at, executed for, and witnessed by individuals, yet CSR literature has long overlooked assessing CSR outcomes at the individual level. Previous CSR research has focused primarily on macro- and institutional-level outcomes. The current paper addresses this issue by analyzing the influence of CSR on a crucial stakeholder for hospitality organizations: their employees. Specifically, gratitude and compassion at work were tested as parallel mediators between employees’ perceptions of CSR and their well-being and organizational citizenship behavior directed toward the organization (OCBO). Drawing from the affect theory of social exchange and moral emotions, this article aims to understand how CSR leads to improving employees’ well-being and OCBO through the underlying emotional mechanisms of gratitude and compassion. Survey data from two independent samples were gathered to test the hypotheses. The findings revealed that employees’ perceptions of CSR activities had a significant positive direct effect on eudaimonic well-being but not on hedonic well-being. Gratitude mediated the relationship between perceived CSR and OCBO as well as hedonic well-being. Compassion mediated the relationship between perceived CSR and hedonic well-being as well as OCBO. Besides theoretical contributions of testing these mechanisms together in a hospitality context and evaluating the influence of CSR efforts on certain dimensions of well-being, this research will be particularly relevant to hospitality managers when formulating CSR strategies and promoting a CSR culture.en_US
dcterms.accessRightsopen accessen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCornell hospitality quarterly, 2021, OnlineFirst, https://doi.org/10.1177/1938965520981069en_US
dcterms.isPartOfCornell hospitality quarterlyen_US
dcterms.issued2021-
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85097961108-
dc.identifier.eissn1938-9663en_US
dc.description.validate202105 bcwhen_US
dc.description.oaAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.FolderNumbera0867-n01-
dc.description.fundingSourceSelf-fundeden_US
dc.description.pubStatusEarly releaseen_US
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