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dc.contributorDepartment of Chinese Cultureen_US
dc.creatorJoo, Ien_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-29T05:31:20Z-
dc.date.available2021-04-29T05:31:20Z-
dc.identifier.issn0153-3320en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10397/89694-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCentre de Recherches Linguistiques sur l'Asie Orientaleen_US
dc.rights© KONINKLIJKE BRILL NV. LEIDEN, 2021en_US
dc.subjectKoreanen_US
dc.subjectEtymologyen_US
dc.subjectTheophagyen_US
dc.subjectBaby-talken_US
dc.subjectSound symbolismen_US
dc.subjectBuddhismen_US
dc.subjectAgricultureen_US
dc.titleThe etymology of Korean ssal ‘uncooked grain’ and pap ‘cooked grain’en_US
dc.typeJournal/Magazine Articleen_US
dc.identifier.spage94en_US
dc.identifier.epage110en_US
dc.identifier.volume50en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1163/19606028-bja10013en_US
dcterms.abstractIn this paper, I will provide etymological explanations for the two Korean words for ‘grain’: ssal ‘uncooked grain’ and pap ‘cooked grain.’ The word ssal ‘uncooked grain’ is a loanword from Middle Chinese bu-sat ‘Bodhisattva,’ linking the Buddhist holy figure to the type of food that has a sacred status in Korean culture. The support for this claim comes from the fact that (i) grains were sometimes associated with the Buddha’s body in Korea, and (ii) certain dialects of Japanese have also referred to rice—undoubtedly the most favored type of grain—as bosatsu ‘Bodhisattva’ or buppō-sama ‘Lord Buddha Dharma.’ Moreover, pap ‘cooked grain’ is most likely derived from the baby-talk term for ‘food,’ because cross-linguistically, baby-talk terms for ‘food’ or ‘to eat’ tend to be similar to /papa/ or /mama/, some of which shifted into the adult-talk term for food or a common type of food.en_US
dcterms.accessRightsopen accessen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCahiers de linguistique. Asie orientale (東亞語言學報), Apr. 2021, v. 50, no.1, p. 94-110en_US
dcterms.isPartOfCahiers de linguistique. Asie orientale (東亞語言學報)en_US
dcterms.issued2021-04-
dc.description.validate202104 bcwhen_US
dc.description.oaAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.FolderNumbera0559-n01-
dc.identifier.SubFormID231-
dc.description.fundingSourceOthersen_US
dc.description.fundingTextThe research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No 646612) granted to Martine Robbeets.en_US
dc.description.pubStatusPublisheden_US
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