Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/89328
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dc.contributorUniversity Research Facility in Behavioral and Systems Neuroscienceen_US
dc.contributorDepartment of Rehabilitation Sciencesen_US
dc.creatorTam, WYen_US
dc.creatorWang, Xen_US
dc.creatorCheng, ASKen_US
dc.creatorCheung, KKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-12T09:35:59Z-
dc.date.available2021-03-12T09:35:59Z-
dc.identifier.issn1661-6596en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10397/89328-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMolecular Diversity Preservation International (MDPI)2 February 2021,en_US
dc.rights© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/ 4.0/).en_US
dc.rightsThe following publication Tam, W. Y., Wang, X., Cheng, A. S., & Cheung, K. K. (2021). In Search of Molecular Markers for Cerebellar Neurons. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 22(4), 1850, 1-11 is availiable at https://doi.org10.3390/ijms22041850en_US
dc.subjectCerebellumen_US
dc.subjectGeneticsen_US
dc.subjectLaser-capture microdissectionen_US
dc.subjectNeuronal markeren_US
dc.subjectNext-generation sequencingen_US
dc.subjectSingle-cell transcriptomeen_US
dc.titleIn search of molecular markers for cerebellar neuronsen_US
dc.typeJournal/Magazine Articleen_US
dc.identifier.spage1en_US
dc.identifier.epage11en_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijms22041850en_US
dcterms.abstractThe cerebellum, the region of the brain primarily responsible for motor coordination and balance, also contributes to non-motor functions, such as cognition, speech, and language compre-hension. Maldevelopment and dysfunction of the cerebellum lead to cerebellar ataxia and may even be associated with autism, depression, and cognitive deficits. Hence, normal development of the cerebellum and its neuronal circuitry is critical for the cerebellum to function properly. Although nine major types of cerebellar neurons have been identified in the cerebellar cortex to date, the exact functions of each type are not fully understood due to a lack of cell-specific markers in neurons that renders cell-specific labeling and functional study by genetic manipulation unfeasible. The availa-bility of cell-specific markers is thus vital for understanding the role of each neuronal type in the cerebellum and for elucidating the interactions between cell types within both the developing and mature cerebellum. This review discusses various technical approaches and recent progress in the search for cell-specific markers for cerebellar neurons. © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.en_US
dcterms.accessRightsopen accessen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationInternational journal of molecular sciences, Feb. 2021, v. 22, no. 4, 1850, p. 1-11en_US
dcterms.isPartOfInternational journal of molecular sciencesen_US
dcterms.issued2021-02-
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85100657650-
dc.identifier.eissn1422-0067en_US
dc.identifier.artn1850en_US
dc.description.validate202103 bcvcen_US
dc.description.oaVersion of Recorden_US
dc.identifier.FolderNumbera0617-n02-
dc.identifier.SubFormID609-
dc.description.fundingSourceRGCen_US
dc.description.fundingText1-ZVP8en_US
dc.description.pubStatusPublisheden_US
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