Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/89212
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributorDepartment of Building and Real Estateen_US
dc.creatorNwaogu, JMen_US
dc.creatorChan, APCen_US
dc.creatorTetteh, MOen_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-18T09:15:23Z-
dc.date.available2021-02-18T09:15:23Z-
dc.identifier.issn1726-0531en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10397/89212-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limiteden_US
dc.subjectAnxietyen_US
dc.subjectStressen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectConstruction safetyen_US
dc.subjectIndividual resilienceen_US
dc.titleStaff resilience and coping behavior as protective factors for mental health among construction tradesmenen_US
dc.typeJournal/Magazine Articleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/JEDT-11-2020-0464en_US
dcterms.abstractPurposeen_US
dcterms.abstractConstruction tradesmen are exposed to high levels of stress that can worsen mental health, negatively impacting safety compliance and organization productivity. Hence, effectively coping with stress to prevent mental ill-health becomes an essential point of reference. Thus, this study aims to examine the role of factors such as resilience and coping strategies in protecting tradesmen against mental ill-health.en_US
dcterms.abstractDesign/methodology/approachen_US
dcterms.abstractUsing a cross-sectional survey design, 110 tradesmen from 65 construction companies were surveyed using the Patient Health Questionnaire, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Brief Resilience Scale and Ways of Coping Questionnaire.en_US
dcterms.abstractFindingsen_US
dcterms.abstractThe results were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis. With a 74.5%, 36.4% and 14.6% prevalence rate of self-reported depression, anxiety and suicide ideation among the tradesmen, only positive reappraisal, accepting responsibility coping behaviors and resilience would mitigate the likelihood of developing mental ill-health symptoms.en_US
dcterms.abstractOriginality/valueen_US
dcterms.abstractThis study has extended existing literature by providing information vital to building interventions to deal with stressors effectively. This information would benefit individuals, organizations and the economy and equip policymakers with a deeper knowledge base toward improving mental health.en_US
dcterms.accessRightsembargoed accessen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationJournal of Engineering, Design and Technology, Vol. ahead-of-print No. ahead-of-print. https://doi.org/10.1108/JEDT-11-2020-0464en_US
dcterms.isPartOfJournal of engineering, design and technologyen_US
dcterms.issued2021-
dc.identifier.eissn1758-8901en_US
dc.description.validate202102 bcwhen_US
dc.description.oaNot applicableen_US
dc.identifier.FolderNumbera0582-n01-
dc.identifier.SubFormID279-
dc.description.fundingSourceSelf-fundeden_US
dc.description.pubStatusEarly releaseen_US
dc.date.embargo0000-00-00 (to be updated)en_US
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article
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Embargo End Date 0000-00-00 (to be updated)
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