Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/87992
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dc.contributorSchool of Nursingen_US
dc.creatorYu, BYMen_US
dc.creatorYeung, WFen_US
dc.creatorLam, JCSen_US
dc.creatorYuen, SCSen_US
dc.creatorLam, SCen_US
dc.creatorChung, VCHen_US
dc.creatorChung, KFen_US
dc.creatorLee, PHen_US
dc.creatorHo, FYYen_US
dc.creatorHo, JYSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-07T06:53:40Z-
dc.date.available2020-09-07T06:53:40Z-
dc.identifier.issn1389-9457en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10397/87992-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rights© 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en US
dc.rights© 2020. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.en US
dc.rightsThe following publication Yu, B. Y.-M., Yeung, W.-F., Lam, J. C.-S., Yuen, S. C.-S., Lam, S. C., Chung, V. C.-H., Chung, K.-F., Lee, P. H., Ho, F. Y.-Y., & Ho, J. Y.-S. (2020). Prevalence of sleep disturbances during COVID-19 outbreak in an urban Chinese population: a cross-sectional study. Sleep Medicine, 74, 18-24 is available at https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2020.07.009.en US
dc.subjectInsomniaen_US
dc.subjectPandemicen_US
dc.subjectEpidemicen_US
dc.subjectWeb-baseden_US
dc.subjectMasksen_US
dc.subjectCoronavirusen_US
dc.titlePrevalence of sleep disturbances during COVID-19 outbreak in an urban Chinese population : a cross-sectional studyen_US
dc.typeJournal/Magazine Articleen_US
dc.identifier.spage18en_US
dc.identifier.epage24en_US
dc.identifier.volume74en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.sleep.2020.07.009en_US
dcterms.abstractObjective: The COVID-19 pandemic is a large-scale public health emergency that likely precipitated sleep disturbances in the community. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and correlates of sleep disturbances during the early phase of COVID-19 pandemic.en_US
dcterms.abstractMethods: This web-based cross-sectional study recruited 1138 Hong Kong adults using convenience sampling over a two-week period from 6th April 2020. The survey collected data on sleep disturbances, mood, stress, stock of infection control supplies, perceived risk of being infected by COVID-19, and sources for acquiring COVID-19 information. The participants were asked to compare their recent sleep and sleep before the outbreak. The Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) was used to assess their current insomnia severity. Prevalence was weighted according to 2016 population census.en_US
dcterms.abstractResults: The weighted prevalence of worsened sleep quality, difficulty in sleep initiation, and shortened sleep duration since the outbreak were 38.3%, 29.8%, and 29.1%, respectively. The prevalence of current insomnia (ISI score of ≥10) was 29.9%. Insufficient stock of masks was significantly associated with worsened sleep quality, impaired sleep initiation, shortened sleep duration, and current insomnia in multivariate logistic regression (adjusted OR = 1.57, 1.72, 1.99, and 1.96 respectively, all p < 0.05).en_US
dcterms.abstractConclusion: A high proportion of people in Hong Kong felt that their sleep had worsened since the COVID-19 outbreak. Insufficient stock of masks was one of the risk factors that were associated with sleep disturbances. Adequate and stable supply of masks may play an important role to maintain the sleep health in the Hong Kong general population during a pandemic outbreak.en_US
dcterms.accessRightsopen accessen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationSleep medicine, Oct. 2020, v. 74, p. 18-24en_US
dcterms.isPartOfSleep medicineen_US
dcterms.issued2020-10-
dc.identifier.eissn1878-5506en_US
dc.description.oaAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.FolderNumbera0472-n01en_US
dc.description.pubStatusPublisheden_US
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