Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/82150
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dc.contributorDepartment of Rehabilitation Sciences-
dc.creatorFung, XCC-
dc.creatorPakpour, AH-
dc.creatorWu, YK-
dc.creatorFan, CW-
dc.creatorLin, CY-
dc.creatorTsang, HWH-
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-05T05:58:52Z-
dc.date.available2020-05-05T05:58:52Z-
dc.identifier.issn1661-7827-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10397/82150-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMolecular Diversity Preservation International (MDPI)en_US
dc.rights© 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en_US
dc.rightsThe following publication Fung XCC, Pakpour AH, Wu Y-K, Fan C-W, Lin C-Y, Tsang HWH. Psychosocial Variables Related to Weight-Related Self-Stigma in Physical Activity among Young Adults across Weight Status. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(1):64, is available at https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010064en_US
dc.subjectOverweighten_US
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_US
dc.subjectStigmaen_US
dc.subjectThe theory of planned behavioren_US
dc.titlePsychosocial variables related to weight-related self-stigma in physical activity among young adults across weight statusen_US
dc.typeJournal/Magazine Articleen_US
dc.identifier.volume17-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph17010064-
dcterms.abstractA healthy lifestyle with sufficient physical activity (PA) can contribute to weight management. Yet, many people do not maintain a healthy lifestyle. To explain PA, we propose a model that incorporates the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) with weight-related self-stigma. We recruited 325 young adults to complete questionnaires regarding their physical activities, weight-related self-stigma, and TPB factors. We used structural equation modeling to examine the model fit and the path invariance across weight groups. The model showed excellent model fit, but path invariance was not supported. Weight-related self-stigma significantly explained the perceived behavioral control, behavioral intention, and engagement of PA. People without overweight and people with overweight have different considerations for PA. Weight-related self-stigma is important for PA as well. To promote a healthy lifestyle, healthcare providers should provide different suggestions or interventions that suit their patients’ weight-related concerns.-
dcterms.accessRightsopen accessen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationInternational journal of environmental research and public health, 2020, v. 17, no. 1, 64-
dcterms.isPartOfInternational journal of environmental research and public health-
dcterms.issued2020-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000509391500064-
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85076999267-
dc.identifier.pmid31861769-
dc.identifier.eissn1660-4601-
dc.identifier.artn64-
dc.description.validate202006 bcma-
dc.description.oaVersion of Recorden_US
dc.identifier.FolderNumberOA_Scopus/WOSen_US
dc.description.pubStatusPublisheden_US
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