Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/79723
Title: The mediation role of self-esteem for self-stigma on quality of life for people with schizophrenia : a retrospectively longitudinal study
Authors: Huang, WY
Chen, SP
Pakpour, AH
Lin, CY 
Keywords: Linear mixed-effect model
Mediating effect
Serious mental illness
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Source: Journal of Pacific RIM psychology, 2018, v. 12, e10 How to cite?
Journal: Journal of Pacific RIM psychology 
Abstract: Background: Among patients with schizophrenia, there is evidence of a negative association between self-stigma and subjective quality of life (SQoL), and self-esteem was an important mediator in the association. We attempted to use a longitudinal study to investigate the aforementioned mediation on a sample with schizophrenia.
Methods: We used longitudinal data retrieved from medical records of a psychiatric centre between June 2014 and December 2015. In the data, we retrieved information of self-stigma using the Self-Stigma Scale - Short; SQoL, using the WHO questionnaire on the Quality of Life - Short Form; and self-esteem, using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. All the measures were evaluated five times. Linear mixed-effect models accompanied by Sobel tests were used to tackle the mediating effects.
Results: Data from 74 patients (57 males) with schizophrenia were eligible for analysis; their mean (SD) age was 39.53 (10.67); mean age of onset was 22.95 (8.38). Self-esteem was a mediator for patients in physical (p = .039), psychological (p = .003), and social SQoL (p = .004), but not in environment SQoL (p = .051).
Conclusion: Based on our findings, mental health professionals could tailor different programs to patients with schizophrenia, such as self-stigma reduction and self-esteem improvement programs. However, treatment as a whole should be sensitive to both self-stigma and self-esteem. Also, we should consider individuals' health and wellbeing from social perspectives of disability rather than the medical model of disability emphasising symptoms and medications.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/79723
EISSN: 1834-4909
DOI: 10.1017/prp.2017.18
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

2
Citations as of Jan 5, 2019

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

1
Citations as of Jan 14, 2019

Page view(s)

1
Citations as of Jan 14, 2019

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.