Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/79275
Title: Perceived stigma of caregivers : psychometric evaluation for devaluation of consumer families scale
Authors: Chang, CC
Su, JA
Chang, KC
Lin, CY 
Koschorke, M
Thornicroft, G
Keywords: Confirmatory facto analysis
Family caregiv
Perceived stigma
People with menta illness
Instrumental study
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Elsevier
Source: International journal of clinical and health psychology, May-Aug. 2018, v. 18, no. 2, p. 170-178 How to cite?
Journal: International journal of clinical and health psychology 
Abstract: Background/Objective: The Devaluation of Consumer Families Scale (DCFS) is commonly used to measure perceived stigma towards family members of people with mental illness. However, its factorial structure has never been confirmed using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). This study aimed to test the psychometric properties of the DCFS Taiwan version (DCFS-TW).
Method: Family caregivers (N=511) completed the DCFS-TW (97 completed the DCFS again after 2 to 4 weeks) and other instruments. CFA, test-retest reliability, internal consistency, concurrent validity, and known-group validity were analyzed.
Results: The three-factor structure of the DCFS-TW performed better than the one-factor structure. Test-retest reliability (r =.66) and internal consistency were satisfactory (04 =.85); concurrent validity (absolute r =.20 to.58) was acceptable; known-group validity was supported by the significantly different DCFS-TW scores in clinical characteristics (had been vs. had not been hospitalized; had been vs. had not been compulsorily admitted).
Conclusions: The DCFS-TW has decent psychometric properties and is suitable for health professionals to measure perceived stigma towards family members of people with mental illness.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/79275
ISSN: 1697-2600
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.