Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/76480
Title: Non-renditions in court interpreting A corpus-based study
Authors: Cheung, AKF 
Keywords: Non-rendition
Court interpreting
Textual
Interactional
Self-initiated
Other-prompted
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: John Benjamins
Source: Babel, 2017, v. 63, no. 2, p. 174-199 How to cite?
Journal: Babel 
Abstract: By examining the types and frequencies of non-renditions in a 100-hour corpus of court interpreting records from Hong Kong, this study demonstrated that court interpreters actively coordinate communication when carrying out their interpreting duties. Non-renditions are interpreters' utterances that do not have a corresponding counterpart in the source language, and such renditions are ordinarily used to coordinate interpreter-mediated exchanges. This analysis revealed that in the Hong Kong court setting, non-renditions were less common in English (the court language) than in Cantonese (the main language of the witnesses and defendants). In the Cantonese subsample, interactional non-renditions were more common than textual non-renditions, and most of these utterances were self-initiated rather than prompted by others. In the English subsample, textual non-renditions were more common than interactional non-renditions, and most of them were other-prompted. The skewed distribution of non-renditions, and particularly the tendency to address non-renditions to the lay participants, suggests that court interpreters may not be absolutely impartial.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/76480
ISSN: 0521-9744
EISSN: 1569-9668
DOI: 10.1075/babel.63.2.02che
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