Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/74766
Title: Increase in the prevalence of hypertension among adults exposed to the Great Chinese Famine during early life
Authors: Liu, L
Xu, X
Zeng, H
Zhang, Y
Shi, Z
Zhang, F
Cao, X
Xie, YJ 
Reis, C
Zhao, Y
Keywords: Adulthood
Childhood
Chinese famine
Hypertension
Malnutrition
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.
Source: Environmental health and preventive medicine, 2017, v. 22, no. 1 How to cite?
Journal: Environmental health and preventive medicine 
Abstract: Objective: This study aimed to assess the association between exposure to the Great Chinese Famine (1959-1961) during early life and hypertension in adulthood. Methods: From July to September 2009, 1224 eligible adults were recruited in a cross-sectional survey using a multi-stage stratified random sampling method in Chongqing China. A questionnaire was used to collect information of hypertension and sociodemographic factors. Participants were categorized as childhood, fetal, and none exposure to famine based on the date of birth. Results: Of the sample, 12.3% reported having hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension varied by famine status: 11.9% in childhood exposure, 16.1% in fetal exposure, and 10.2% in non-exposure group. After adjusting for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, compared with non-exposure group, fetal exposure group had an increased likelihood of having hypertension with odds ratio of 1.79 (95%CI 1.13-2.84). Although there was no significant gender and famine interaction, the positive association between famine exposure and hypertension was stronger among women than men. Conclusion: Fetal exposure to the Chinese famine may be associated with an increased risk of arthritis in adulthood in women.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/74766
ISSN: 1342-078X
EISSN: 1347-4715
DOI: 10.1186/s12199-017-0671-2
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