Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/74563
Title: The associations between religion, bereavement and depression among Hong Kong nurses
Authors: Cheung, T 
Lee, PH 
Yip, PSF
Keywords: Bereavement
Depression
Mental health
Nurses
Religion
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: BioMed Central
Source: BMC research notes, 2017, v. 10, 242 How to cite?
Journal: BMC research notes 
Abstract: Background: This paper is to examine the associations between religion, bereavement and depression among nursing professionals using a cross-sectional survey design. There is little empirical evidence in Asia suggesting that religion may either increase or lower the likelihood of nursing professionals being depressed.
Methods: We analyzed the results of a Mental Health Survey soliciting data from 850 Hong Kong nurses (aged 21-59, 178 males) regarding their mental well-being and associated factors, including participants' socio-economic profile and recent life-events. Multiple linear regression analyses examined associations between religion, bereavement and depression.
Results: Religious faith is weakly associated with lower self-reported depression in bereavement.
Conclusions: Our findings confirm those studies suggesting that religion positively affects mental health and yet healthcare providers have yet to assimilate this insight.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/74563
ISSN: 1756-0500
DOI: 10.1186/s13104-017-2588-7
Rights: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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