Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/6519
Title: Distinct neural activity associated with focused-attention meditation and loving-kindness meditation
Authors: Lee, TMC
Leung, MK
Hou, WK
Tang, JCY
Yin, J
So, KF
Lee, CF
Chan, CCH 
Keywords: Compassion meditation
Emotion regulation
Mindfulness scale
Negative affect
FMRI
Brain
Validation
Recognition
Performance
Activation
Issue Date: 15-Aug-2012
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Source: PLoS one, 15 Aug., 2012, v. 7, no. 8, e40054, p. 1-11 How to cite?
Journal: PLoS one 
Abstract: This study examined the dissociable neural effects of ānāpānasati (focused-attention meditation, FAM) and mettā (loving-kindness meditation, LKM) on BOLD signals during cognitive (continuous performance test, CPT) and affective (emotion-processing task, EPT, in which participants viewed affective pictures) processing. Twenty-two male Chinese expert meditators (11 FAM experts, 11 LKM experts) and 22 male Chinese novice meditators (11 FAM novices, 11 LKM novices) had their brain activity monitored by a 3T MRI scanner while performing the cognitive and affective tasks in both meditation and baseline states. We examined the interaction between state (meditation vs. baseline) and expertise (expert vs. novice) separately during LKM and FAM, using a conjunction approach to reveal common regions sensitive to the expert meditative state. Additionally, exclusive masking techniques revealed distinct interactions between state and group during LKM and FAM. Specifically, we demonstrated that the practice of FAM was associated with expertise-related behavioral improvements and neural activation differences in attention task performance. However, the effect of state LKM meditation did not carry over to attention task performance. On the other hand, both FAM and LKM practice appeared to affect the neural responses to affective pictures. For viewing sad faces, the regions activated for FAM practitioners were consistent with attention-related processing; whereas responses of LKM experts to sad pictures were more in line with differentiating emotional contagion from compassion/emotional regulation processes. Our findings provide the first report of distinct neural activity associated with forms of meditation during sustained attention and emotion processing.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/6519
EISSN: 1932-6203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0040054
Rights: © Lee et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
The website of Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC by 3.0) is located at <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/>
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