Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/63796
Title: Progress of the study on iron disorder diseases
Other Titles: 鐵紊亂相關疾病的研究進展
Authors: Wang, L
Duan, XL
Wang, YZ
Chang, YZ
Qian, ZM
Keywords: Iron deficiency anemia
Brain develop
Iron deficiency
Iron overloading
Hepcidin
Issue Date: 2007
Publisher: 中國生理科學會
Source: 生理科学进展 (Progress in physiological sciences), 2007, v. 38, no. 4, p. 307-312 How to cite?
Journal: 生理科学进展 (Progress in physiological sciences) 
Abstract: The important function of iron as a necessary nutrition element in mammals is more and more recognized by people. The normal physiological level of iron is ensured by the rigid regulation mechanism of iron metabolism in animals. Various clinical diseases are induced by iron disorder, like iron deficiency and iron overloading in the body. The current study showed that Hepcidin may be a key factor to control intestinal iron absorbing and regulates iron homeostasis, and may be an important regulating hormone of iron metabolism. It was summarized in this paper that the physiological functions, iron deficiency diseases, for instance iron deficiency anemia and neural diseases of children, and iron overload diseases, such as liver damage, cardiovascular diseases, Parkinson’s disease, and cancers etc. And it was expected how to develop the therapy of iron disorder diseases in gene level use modern techniques.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/63796
ISSN: 0559-7765
Rights: © 2007 中国学术期刊电子杂志出版社。本内容的使用仅限于教育、科研之目的。
© 2007 China Academic Journal Electronic Publishing House. It is to be used strictly for educational and research purposes.
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