Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/6325
Title: Halocarbons in the atmosphere of the industrial-related Pearl River Delta region of China
Authors: Chan, LY
Chu, KW
Keywords: Halocarbons
ODSs
CFCs
PRD
Industrial activities
VOCs
Issue Date: Feb-2007
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Source: Journal of geophysical research. Atmospheres, Feb. 2007, v. 112, no. D4, D04305 How to cite?
Journal: Journal of geophysical research. Atmospheres 
Abstract: In a study conducted in 2000, 19 halocarbons from 78 canister air samples were measured in five industrial cities in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), one of the fastest growing industrial regions in China. Preliminary year 2000 halocarbon levels have been derived using available data and information. Comparisons have been made between the data obtained in this study and the corresponding estimated global/tropical surface mixing ratios obtained from the literature. With the exception of CFC-114 and halon-2402, the halocarbons had significant enhancements, presumably due to their recent increased production and extensive industrial uses. In contrast to the small enhancements (<7%) for two chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11 and CFC-12), large enhancements (>30%) for three HCFC replacements (HCFC-22, -141b, -142b) were observed. In general, HCFCs have virtually replaced CFCs, except for some localized usage. The median of HFC-134a also had a 36% enhancement; however, 23% of the samples were near or at the global background level. These contradictory results could not give a clear situation of uses of this new chemical in the region. Our data also indicate that halocarbon-based cleaning solvents, including CFC-113, methyl chloroform, trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene, were still frequently used in PRD industries. High mixing ratios of these halogenated solvents were frequently measured in Dongguan, a city with light industry. Higher atmospheric levels of the three methyl halides (−Cl, −Br, and −I) were found in a coastal city, Jiangmen. These may be contributed to by industrial emissions and coastal terrestrial and coastal seawater sources.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/6325
ISSN: 2169-897X
EISSN: 2169-8996
DOI: 10.1029/2006JD007097
Rights: Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.
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