Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/61532
Title: Implementation of dispersion-free slow acoustic wave propagation and phase engineering with helical-structured metamaterials
Authors: Zhu, X
Li, K
Zhang, P
Zhu, J 
Zhang, J
Tian, C
Liu, S
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Source: Nature communications, 2016, v. 7, 11731 How to cite?
Journal: Nature communications 
Abstract: The ability to slow down wave propagation in materials has attracted significant research interest. A successful solution will give rise to manageable enhanced wave-matter interaction, freewheeling phase engineering and spatial compression of wave signals. The existing methods are typically associated with constructing dispersive materials or structures with local resonators, thus resulting in unavoidable distortion of waveforms. Here we show that, with helical-structured acoustic metamaterials, it is now possible to implement dispersion-free sound deceleration. The helical-structured metamaterials present a non-dispersive high effective refractive index that is tunable through adjusting the helicity of structures, while the wavefront revolution plays a dominant role in reducing the group velocity. Finally, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate that the helical-structured metamaterials with designed inhomogeneous unit cells can turn a normally incident plane wave into a self-Accelerating beam on the prescribed parabolic trajectory. The helical-structured metamaterials will have profound impact to applications in explorations of slow wave physics.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/61532
EISSN: 2041-1723
DOI: 10.1038/ncomms11731
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