Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/9810
Title: Executive function deficits and neural discordance in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Authors: Chan, AS
Cheung, MC
Han, YMY
Sze, SL
Leung, WW
Man, HS
To, CY
Keywords: Autism Spectrum Disorders
EEG
Executive dysfunctions
Neural discordance
Issue Date: 2009
Publisher: Elsevier
Source: Clinical neurophysiology, 2009, v. 120, no. 6, p. 1107-1115 How to cite?
Journal: Clinical neurophysiology 
Abstract: Objective: This study examined neurophysiologic activities, executive dysfunctions, and their association in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Methods: Thirty-eight normal and 16 children with ASD participated with parental consent. Executive functions were measured using neuropsychological tests and parent ratings, and neurophysiologic activities were measured using EEG to yield cordance values, an indirect measure of brain perfusion. Results: Children with ASD made significantly more intrusion errors and False Alarms on the Hong Kong List Learning Test (HKLLT) and Object Recognition Test (OR) than normal children, but were comparable to normal children on the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test and Continuous Performance Test. They also showed significantly poorer executive functions in everyday activities as shown on the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF), and had lower frontal perfusion patterns than normal children as shown in the neurophysiologic cordance measures. Frontal cordance values were found to be significantly associated with executive dysfunctions in HKLLT Delayed Intrusions, OR False Alarms and BRIEF. Conclusions: Children with ASD were impaired in everyday executive functioning and response inhibition. The cordance value, which has been shown to correlate with brain perfusion in a number of studies, was significantly correlated with executive dysfunctions. Significance: Exploration of this measure as an index for response to intervention is warranted.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/9810
ISSN: 1388-2457
EISSN: 1872-8952
DOI: 10.1016/j.clinph.2009.04.002
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