Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/8962
Title: Does weight-shifting exercise improve postural symmetry in sitting in people with hemiplegia?
Authors: Au Yeung, SSY 
Issue Date: 2003
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Source: Brain injury, 2003, v. 17, no. 9, p. 789-797 How to cite?
Journal: Brain injury 
Abstract: Background: Weight-shifting exercise was empirically practised in correcting the biased posture of people with stroke-induced hemiplegia. Objectives: (1) Evaluate the loading symmetry at the buttock-seat interface as a reflection of a postural defect in sitting. (2) Investigate if weight-shifting exercises could correct the postural problem of people with hemiplegia. Design: Control group design. Participants: 16 subjects with hemiplegia after stroke and 14 healthy individuals. Procedures: Subjects were assessed for buttock-seat interface loading while in erect sitting using a seat pressure mapping system. Subjects with stroke then practised one session of weight-shifting exercise followed by a reassessment. Results: The subjects with hemiplegia, particularly those with right hemisphere lesion, had more load borne at the buttock ipsilateral to the side of stroke lesion. The weight-shifting exercise did not produce an immediate improvement on the loading asymmetry. Conclusion: The exercise would require further investigation to clarify its benefits in treating postural problems after stroke.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/8962
ISSN: 0269-9052
EISSN: 1362-301X
DOI: 10.1080/0269905031000088487
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