Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/8819
Title: Perceived effort and low back pain in non-emergency ambulance workers : implications for rehabilitation
Authors: Tam, GYT
Yeung, SS 
Keywords: Low back pain definitions
Non-emergency ambulance worker
Personal risk factors
Physical risk factors
Psychosocial risk factors
Issue Date: 2006
Publisher: Springer
Source: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, 2006, v. 16, no. 2, p. 231-240 How to cite?
Journal: Journal of occupational rehabilitation 
Abstract: Introduction: This study aims to explore factors associated with low back pain (LBP) that required treatment from health care provider among non-emergency ambulance transfer workers. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted to 38 workers of a major hospital in Hong Kong. The influences of four categories of risk factors (personal, physical, psychosocial, and exposure factors) in the prevalence of LBP were investigated by objective measurement and self-reported questionnaires. A modified Nordic musculoskeletal symptoms survey and sick leave record were used to document the prevalence of LBP. Univariate analyses followed by multiple logistic regression analyses were used to explore the risk factors associated with LBP cases. Results: The results revealed that LBP was associated with age (OR=0.75, CI=0.56-1.00, P < 0.05), perceived effort (OR=7.95, CI=1.46-43.27, P < 0.05), job satisfaction (OR=4.18 CI=1.42-12.33, P < 0.01), and flexor peak torque at 120°/s (OR=1.09 CI= 0.99-1.19, P=0.07). Conclusion: This study suggests that workers' perceived exertion has an valuable role in assessing risk at this workplace. A high perceived exertion at work can signal the need for work adjustment or modification to avoid progression of low back disorder to persistent pain or intense pain. The effects of work adjustment or modification in affected workers needs to be systematically investigated.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/8819
ISSN: 1053-0487
EISSN: 1573-3688
DOI: 10.1007/s10926-006-9019-2
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