Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/8601
Title: A field comparison of neck and shoulder postures in symptomatic and asymptomatic office workers
Authors: Szeto, GPY 
Straker, L
Raine, S
Keywords: Discomfort
Forward head posture
Work-related neck and upper limb disorders
Issue Date: 2002
Publisher: Pergamon Press
Source: Applied ergonomics, 2002, v. 33, no. 1, p. 75-84 How to cite?
Journal: Applied ergonomics 
Abstract: Poor neck and shoulder postures have been suggested to be a cause of neck and shoulder pain in computer workers. The present study aimed to evaluate and compare the head, neck and shoulder postures of office workers with and without symptoms in these regions, in their actual work environments. The two all female subject groups reported significantly different discomfort scores across five trials repeated in a single working day. The results of repeated video capture and two-dimensional motion analysis showed that there were trends for increased head tilt and neck flexion postures in the symptomatic subjects (n = 8), compared to the asymptomatic subjects (n = 8). Symptomatic subjects also tended to have more protracted acromions compared with asymptomatic subjects and showed greater movement excursions in the head segment and the acromion. All subjects demonstrated an approximately 10% increase in forward head posture from their relaxed sitting postures when working with the computer display, but there were no significant changes in posture as a result of time-at-work.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/8601
ISSN: 0003-6870
EISSN: 1872-9126
DOI: 10.1016/S0003-6870(01)00043-6
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

191
Last Week
0
Last month
2
Citations as of Aug 15, 2018

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

169
Last Week
1
Last month
3
Citations as of Aug 17, 2018

Page view(s)

106
Last Week
4
Last month
Citations as of Aug 20, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.