Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/8269
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributorDepartment of Rehabilitation Sciences-
dc.creatorLee, TMC-
dc.creatorAu, RKC-
dc.creatorLiu, HL-
dc.creatorTing, KH-
dc.creatorHuang, CM-
dc.creatorChan, CCH-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-19T06:58:25Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-19T06:58:25Z-
dc.identifier.issn0278-2626-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10397/8269-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Pressen_US
dc.subjectDeceptionen_US
dc.subjectFunctional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)en_US
dc.subjectGenuine errorsen_US
dc.subjectLie detectionen_US
dc.subjectLyingen_US
dc.subjectMemory impairmenten_US
dc.titleAre errors differentiable from deceptive responses when feigning memory impairment? An fMRI studyen_US
dc.typeJournal/Magazine Articleen_US
dc.identifier.spage406-
dc.identifier.epage412-
dc.identifier.volume69-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bandc.2008.09.002-
dcterms.abstractPrevious neuroimaging studies have suggested that the neural activity associated with truthful recall, with false memory, and with feigned memory impairment are different from one another. Here, we report a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study that addressed an important but yet unanswered question: Is the neural activity associated with intentional faked responses and with errors differentiable? Using a word list learning recognition paradigm, the findings of this mixed event-related fMRI study clearly indicated that the brain activity associated with intentional faked responses was different to the activity associated with errors committed unintentionally. For intentional faked responses, significant activation was found in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, the posterior cingulate region, and the precuneus. However, no significant activation was observed for unintentional errors. The results suggest that deception, in terms of feigning memory impairment, is not only more cognitively demanding than making unintentional errors but also utilizes different cognitive processes.-
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBrain and cognition, 2009, v. 69, no. 2, p. 406-412-
dcterms.isPartOfBrain and cognition-
dcterms.issued2009-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263581900021-
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-59349109590-
dc.identifier.pmid18938008-
dc.identifier.eissn1090-2147-
dc.identifier.rosgroupidr43886-
dc.description.ros2008-2009 > Academic research: refereed > Publication in refereed journal-
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article
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