Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/81578
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dc.contributor.authorLi, PLen_US
dc.contributor.authorYick, KLen_US
dc.contributor.authorYip, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-02T03:43:20Z-
dc.date.available2020-01-02T03:43:20Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of fiber bioengineering and informatics, 2016, v.9, no.3, p. 133-143en_US
dc.identifier.issn1940-8676en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10397/81578-
dc.description.abstractDegenerative changes and foot deformities are common when people get older. Foot deformities, such as hallux valgus, bunionettes and pes planus, are commonly found among older people, which may lead to changes in foot anthropometry. A decline in functional mobility and greater risk of falling are linked to foot deformities and footwear. This study therefore aims to evaluate the anthropometric measurements between healthy and deformed feet in order to determine the key foot measurements in relation to the deformed foot which can also act as indicators in current footwear sizing systems. By using a 3D hand- held scanner, 11 foot anthropometric measurements are captured and used to characterise the dimensions and foot shape between healthy and deformed feet. A total of 49 elderly people between the ages of 65-95 years old, including 41 women and 8 men (mean: 81.71; SD: 7.08) are recruited for this study. The results indicate that the foot characteristics of elderly people with foot deformities are different from those without deformities, especially in the larger deformity of the degree of hallux valgus and increased width of the ball for women, and higher instep height for men. The length of the foot and ball, width and girth of the ball, and degree of hallux valgus deformity are common predictors for differentiating between healthy and deformed feet. It is also found that the current footwear sizing systems fail to accommodate the foot dimensions of elderly people in both foot length and width, which may therefore lead to foot discomfort and even limit their daily life activities.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipInstitute of Textiles and Clothingen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipHong Kong Community Collegeen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherGlobal Science Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of fiber bioengineering and informaticsen_US
dc.subjectFoot problemsen_US
dc.subjectAnthropometryen_US
dc.subjectFootwear designen_US
dc.subjectElderlyen_US
dc.subject3D scanningen_US
dc.titleFoot anthropometric measurements of Hong Kong elderly : implications for footwear designen_US
dc.typeJournal/Magazine Articleen_US
dc.identifier.spage133en_US
dc.identifier.epage143en_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3993/jfbim00237en_US
dc.identifier.eissn2617-8699en_US
dc.description.validate202001 bcrcen_US
dc.description.oaNot applicableen_US
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