Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/81556
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dc.contributor.authorYu, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorTao, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CCHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-28T05:46:02Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-28T05:46:02Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationNeuroscience & biobehavioral reviews, 2019, v. 104, p. 43-55en_US
dc.identifier.issn0149-7634-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10397/81556-
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has highlighted the potential of fMRI in discriminating between truth and falsehood. However, falsehoods may not necessarily represent a deliberate intention to deceive; they can be a result of false memory too. It is important to show that fMRI can discriminate between deception and false memory, before it can be applied in legal contexts for deception detection. To this end, we performed a meta-analytic comparison of brain activation between deception and false memory. Activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses were conducted separately on 49 deception (61 contrasts; Ntotal = 991) and 28 false memory (32 contrasts; Ntotal = 484) studies. The contrasts obtained from these meta-analyses were entered into subsequent conjunction and contrast analyses. Deception and false memory tasks activated several frontoparietal regions. Both tasks activated the left superior frontal gyrus. Deception, relative to false memory, was associated with increased activation in the right superior temporal gyrus, right insula, left inferior parietal lobule and right superior frontal gyrus. These results provide some evidence to suggest that fMRI can discriminate between deception and false memory.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Rehabilitation Sciencesen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPergamonen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroscience & biobehavioral reviewsen_US
dc.rights© 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).en_US
dc.rightsThe following publication Yu, J., Tao, Q., Zhang, R., Chan, C. C., & Lee, T. M. (2019). Can fMRI discriminate between deception and false memory? A meta-analytic comparison between deception and false memory studies. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 104, 43-55, is available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.06.027en_US
dc.subjectDeceptionen_US
dc.subjectFalse memoryen_US
dc.subjectfMRIen_US
dc.subjectMeta-analysisen_US
dc.titleCan fMRI discriminate between deception and false memory? A meta-analytic comparison between deception and false memory studiesen_US
dc.typeJournal/Magazine Articleen_US
dc.identifier.spage43-
dc.identifier.epage55-
dc.identifier.volume104-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.06.027-
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85068261922-
dc.description.validate201910 bcma-
dc.description.oapublished_final-
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