Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/80432
Title: Change in household fuels dominates the decrease in PM2.5 exposure and premature mortality in China in 2005-2015
Authors: Zhao, B
Zheng, HT
Wang, SX
Smith, KR
Lu, X
Aunan, K
Gu, Y
Wang, Y
Ding, D
Xing, J
Fu, X 
Yang, XD
Liou, KN
Hao, JM
Keywords: Health impact
Household air pollution
Ambient air pollution
Integrated exposure assessment
Cooking
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: National Academy of Sciences
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 4 Dec. 2018, v. 115, no. 49, p. 12401-12406 How to cite?
Journal: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 
Abstract: To tackle the severe fine particle (PM2.5) pollution in China, the government has implemented stringent control policies mainly on power plants, industry, and transportation since 2005, but estimates of the effectiveness of the policy and the temporal trends in health impacts are subject to large uncertainties. By adopting an integrated approach that combines chemical transport simulation, ambient/household exposure evaluation, and health-impact assessment, we find that the integrated population-weighted exposure to PM2.5 (IPWE) decreased by 47% (95% confidence interval, 37-55%) from 2005 [180 (146-219) mu g/m(3)] to 2015 [96 (83-111) mu g/m(3)]. Unexpectedly, 90% (86-93%) of such reduction is attributed to reduced household solid-fuel use, primarily resulting from rapid urbanization and improved incomes rather than specific control policies. The IPWE due to household fuels for both cooking and heating decreased, but the impact of cooking is significantly larger. The reduced household-related IPWE is estimated to avoid 0.40 (0.25-0.57) million premature deaths annually, accounting for 33% of the PM2.5-induced mortality in 2015. The IPWE would be further reduced by 63% (57-68%) if the remaining household solid fuels were replaced by clean fuels, which would avoid an additional 0.51 (0.40-0.64) million premature deaths. Such a transition to clean fuels, especially for heating, requires technology innovation and policy support to overcome the barriers of high cost of distribution systems, as is recently being attempted in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei area. We suggest that household-fuel use be more highly prioritized in national control policies, considering its effects on PM2.5 exposures.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/80432
ISSN: 0027-8424
EISSN: 1091-6490
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1812955115
Rights: This open access article is distributed underCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
The following publication Zhao, B., Zheng, H. T., Wang, S. X., Smith, K. R., Lu, X., Aunan, K., . . . Hao, J. M. (2018). Change in household fuels dominates the decrease in PM2.5 exposure and premature mortality in China in 2005-2015. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 115(49), 12401-12406 is available at https://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1812955115
Appears in Collections:Conference Paper

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Zhao_Change_Fuels_Decrease.pdf1.4 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record
PIRA download icon_1.1View/Download Contents

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

3
Citations as of Mar 29, 2019

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

4
Citations as of Apr 4, 2019

Page view(s)

46
Citations as of Jul 16, 2019

Download(s)

23
Citations as of Jul 16, 2019

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.