Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/80354
Title: Cognitive behavioural therapy for fear of falling and balance among older people : a systematic review and meta-analysis
Authors: Liu, TW 
Ng, GYF 
Chung, RCK 
Ng, SSM 
Keywords: Balance
Balance self-efficacy
Cognitive behavioural therapy
Fear of falling
Older people
Stroke
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Source: Age and ageing, 2018, v. 47, no. 4, p. 520-527 How to cite?
Journal: Age and ageing 
Abstract: Background: fear of falling is prevalent among older people and associated with various health outcomes. A growing number of studies have examined the effects of interventions designed to reduce the fear of falling and improve balance among older people, yet our current understanding is restricted to physiological interventions. Psychological interventions such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) have not been reviewed and meta-analysed.
Objective: to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the effects of CBT on reducing fear of falling and enhancing balance in community-dwelling older people.
Method: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) addressing fear of falling and balance were identified through searches of six electronic databases, concurrent registered clinical trials, forward citation and reference lists of three previous systematic reviews.
Results: a total of six trials involving 1,626 participants were identified. Four studies used group-based interventions and two adopted individual intervention. Intervention period ranged from 4 to 20 weeks, and the number and duration of face-to-face contact varied. Core components of the CBT intervention included cognitive restructuring, personal goal setting and promotion of physical activities. The risk of bias was low across the included studies. Our analysis suggests that CBT interventions have significant immediate and retention effects up to 12 months on reducing fear of falling, and 6 months post-intervention effect on enhancing balance.
Conclusions: CBT appears to be effective in reducing fear of falling and improving balance among older people. Future researches to investigate the use of CBT on reducing fear of falling and improving balance are warranted.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/80354
ISSN: 0002-0729
EISSN: 1468-2834
DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy010
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