Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/7958
Title: Sources of ambient volatile organic compounds and their contributions to photochemical ozone formation at a site in the Pearl River Delta, southern China
Authors: Ling, ZH
Guo, H 
Cheng, HR
Yu, YF
Keywords: Pearl River Delta
Photochemical ozone formation
Source contribution
VOCs
Issue Date: 2011
Publisher: Pergamon Press
Source: Environmental pollution, 2011, v. 159, no. 10, p. 2310-2319 How to cite?
Journal: Environmental pollution 
Abstract: The Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model and the Observation Based Model (OBM) were combined to analyze volatile organic compound (VOC) data collected at a suburban site (WQS) in the PRD region. The purposes are to estimate the VOC source apportionment and investigate the contributions of these sources and species of these sources to the O 3 formation in PRD. Ten VOC sources were identified. We further applied the PMF-extracted concentrations of these 10 sources into the OBM and found "solvent usage 1", "diesel vehicular emissions" and "biomass/biofuel burning" contributed most to the O 3 formation at WQS. Among these three sources, higher Relative Incremental Reactivity (RIR)-weighted values of ethene, toluene and m/p-xylene indicated that they were mainly responsible for local O 3 formation in the region. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the sources of "diesel vehicular emissions", "biomass/biofuel burning" and "solvent usage 1" had low uncertainties whereas "gasoline evaporation" showed the highest uncertainty.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/7958
ISSN: 0269-7491
EISSN: 1873-6424
DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2011.05.001
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

57
Last Week
0
Last month
3
Citations as of Aug 20, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

53
Last Week
0
Last month
2
Citations as of Aug 20, 2017

Page view(s)

41
Last Week
3
Last month
Checked on Aug 20, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.