Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/78921
Title: The effect of tai chi training on the dual-tasking performance of stroke survivors : a randomized controlled trial
Authors: Chan, WN 
Tsang, WWN 
Keywords: Tai Chi
Stroke
Dual tasking
Turning-while-walking
Auditory Stroop test
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Source: Clinical rehabilitation, Aug. 2018, v. 32, no. 8, special issue, p. 1076-1085 How to cite?
Journal: Clinical rehabilitation 
Abstract: Objective: To compare the effect of Tai Chi training with conventional exercise on dual-tasking performance among stroke survivors.
Design: An assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Subjects: Community-dwelling stroke survivors. Setting: Community centers and university. Interventions: Subjects in the Tai Chi group and the conventional exercise group were trained with the corresponding exercises for 12weeks (1hour/session, 2/week). No training was given to the controls. Main measures: An auditory Stroop test, a turning-while-walking test, and a dual-tasking condition that combined the two tests were conducted at baseline, after the intervention, and one month later.
Results: Forty-seven subjects were randomized into Tai Chi group (n=15), conventional exercise group (n=17), or control group (n=15). There was no significant difference in the outcome measures among the three groups after the intervention and at the one month follow-up assessment. Within-group comparisons showed improvements in dual-tasking performance after Tai Chi training and further improvement during the follow-up period (composite score on the auditory Stroop test: pre-assessment: 73.127.6, post-assessment: 89.9 +/- 23.4, follow-up assessment: 91.7 +/- 26.9; completion time of the turning-while-walking test: pre-assessment: 17.7 +/- 6.9seconds, post-assessment: 15.6 +/- 5.2seconds, follow-up assessment: 14.9 +/- 4.9seconds).
Conclusion: Tai Chi training does not have superior effect on dual-tasking performance compared with conventional exercise among stroke survivors. Further studies with larger sample size, longer training, and follow-up periods are needed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/78921
ISSN: 0269-2155
EISSN: 1477-0873
DOI: 10.1177/0269215518777872
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