Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/77391
Title: Self-fitting shape memory polymer foam inducing bone regeneration : a rabbit femoral defect study
Authors: Xie, R 
Hu, J 
Hoffmann, O
Zhang, Y 
Ng, F 
Qin, T
Guo, X 
Keywords: Bone regeneration
Self-fitting
Shape memory polymer foam
Tissue engineering
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Elsevier
Source: Biochimica et biophysica acta. General subjects, 2018, v. 1862, no. 4, p. 936-945 How to cite?
Journal: Biochimica et biophysica acta. General subjects 
Abstract: Although tissue engineering has been attracted greatly for healing of critical-sized bone defects, great efforts for improvement are still being made in scaffold design. In particular, bone regeneration would be enhanced if a scaffold precisely matches the contour of bone defects, especially if it could be implanted into the human body conveniently and safely. In this study, polyurethane/hydroxyapatite-based shape memory polymer (SMP) foam was fabricated as a scaffold substrate to facilitate bone regeneration. The minimally invasive delivery and the self-fitting behavior of the SMP foam were systematically evaluated to demonstrate its feasibility in the treatment of bone defects in vivo. Results showed that the SMP foam could be conveniently implanted into bone defects with a compact shape. Subsequently, it self-matched the boundary of bone defects upon shape-recovery activation in vivo. Micro-computed tomography determined that bone ingrowth initiated at the periphery of the SMP foam with a constant decrease towards the inside. Successful vascularization and bone remodeling were also demonstrated by histological analysis. Thus, our results indicate that the SMP foam demonstrated great potential for bone regeneration.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/77391
ISSN: 0304-4165
EISSN: 1872-8006
DOI: 10.1016/j.bbagen.2018.01.013
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