Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/76934
Title: Highly robust and biocompatible hydrogel for joint injuries
Authors: Chen, Zhengkun
Panyang, Tanyaporn
Poon, Mong Lung
Setiasabda, Kharis Daniel
Advisors: WEN, Chunyi 
LAU, Hin Chung 
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Abstract: Joint injuries are defined as the damage on joint tissues which includes articular cartilage, ligaments, tendons or menisci. Over the years, an array of therapeutic strategies focused on non-surgical conservative management, minimally invasive strategies and surgical strategies has been developed to treat joint injuries. However, none of these developed methods are able to restore the biomechanical properties of the tissues while being biocompatible. Therefore, a new favorable remedial strategy utilizing hydrogel mechanical and biocompatibility properties is proposed to provide an optimal medical approach for joint injuries. While there is a wide spectrum of joint injuries, this project mainly focused on a novel therapeutic device, HydroJel, for meniscus and tendon injuries through the development of highly robust and biocompatible hydrogel for joint injuries.
To optimize the formula of HydroJel, a series of characterization were done including swelling ratio test, compressive and tensile testing and simulation, cell viability assay, and adhesion test. Meanwhile, animal samples from bovines and rats were harvested and tested as the reference for the product modification. In consideration of the product commercialization, the feasibility of 3D printing and double syringe system delivery of HydroJel were explored to verify the possibility in product personalization clinical application.
Regarding the application of HydroJel in meniscus replacement, it was revealed that HydroJel was capable in attaining a compressive modulus comparable to that of bovine and human menisci. Moreover, with the employment of alginate at medium viscosity, the 3D printing of personalized HydroJel was achieved under the novel formulation. Besides, for the tendon rupture repair, histological investigation provided a strong justification in the intimate adhesion between the tendon tissue and HydroJel. The superior effectiveness of HydroJel in relinking the torn tendon and redistributing the concentrated stress which presented in a ruptured tendon, were confirmed under an array of mechanical testing and simulation study. The possible immersion of Hydrogel in the clinical setting was also supported under the double syringe system study. The biocompatibility of HydroJel is established through the cell viability assay whereas the swelling ratio was not perfectly ideal in the swelling test.
To conclude, HydroJel has exhibited a superior biocompatibility and mechanical property to provide a relatively low cost and flexibility usage to various applications worldwide. However, limitations of the product are also identified, including the incomplete characterization, high swelling ratio, and high regulatory standard before entering the market. With this being the case, it is suggested that the completion on product characterization, continuous formula modification and clinical trials are the crucial future development directions.
Award: PolyU Student Entrepreneurial Proof-of-Concept Funding Scheme (2017) - Cash Award
PolyU Student Entrepreneurial Proof-of-Concept Funding Scheme (2017) - POC Fund
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/76934
Programme: Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Biomedical Engineering
Subject Code: BME31112
Subject Title: Biomedical Engineering Research & Design Studies II
Appears in Collections:Outstanding Work by Students

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Project_Report_r.pdfProject report1.62 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
poster_ver2_r.pdfPoster1.39 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
IfE_PolyU_Student_Entrepreneurial_Proof-of-C.pdfAward Info318.33 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
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