Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/75929
Title: van der Waals bonded Co/h-BN contacts to ultrathin black phosphorus devices
Authors: Avsar, A
Tan, JY
Luo, X 
Khoo, KH
Yeo, YT
Watanabe, K
Taniguchi, T
Quek, SY
Ozyilmaz, B
Keywords: Work-function
Tunnel barrier
Boron nitride
Black phosphorus
Encapsulation
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: American Chemical Society
Source: Nano letters, 2017, v. 17, no. 9, p. 5361-5367 How to cite?
Journal: Nano letters 
Abstract: Because of the chemical inertness of two dimensional (2D) hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN), few atomic-layer hBN is often used to encapsulate air-sensitive 2D crystals such as black phosphorus (BP). However, the effects of h-BN on Schottky barrier height, doping, and contact resistance are not well-known. Here, we investigate these effects by fabricating h-BN encapsulated BP transistors with cobalt (Co) contacts. In sharp contrast to directly Co contacted p-type BP devices, we observe strong n-type conduction upon insertion of the h-BN at the Co/BP interface. First-principles calculations show that this difference arises from the much larger interface dipole at the Co/h-BN interface compared to the Co/BP interface, which reduces the work function of the Co/h-BN contact. The Co/h-BN contacts exhibit low contact resistances (similar to 4.5 k Omega) and are Schottky barrier-free. This allows us to probe high electron mobilities (4,200 cm(2)/(Vs)) and observe insulator metal transitions even under two-terminal measurement geometry.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/75929
ISSN: 1530-6984
EISSN: 1530-6992
DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b01817
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