Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/74898
Title: The increment of social axioms over broad personality traits in the prediction of dyadic adjustment : an investigation across four ethnic groups
Authors: Iliescu, D
Dincă, M
Bond, MH 
Keywords: Dyadic adjustment
Ethnicity
Social axioms
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: John Wiley and Sons Ltd
Source: European journal of personality, 2017, v. 31, no. 6, p. 630-641 How to cite?
Journal: European journal of personality 
Abstract: This study investigates the relationship between personality, social axioms, and dyadic adjustment. A sample of 420 participants (210 heterosexual couples), approximately evenly distributed between four ethnic backgrounds (Romanian, Hungarian, German, and Rroma), was investigated in a cross-sectional approach with the Romanian versions of the Social Axioms Survey, the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, and the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. The analyses were based on the actor–partner interdependence model. The results showed that social axioms show incremental validity over personality traits in the prediction of dyadic adjustment, attesting to the usefulness of a worldview measure in predicting interpersonal outcomes over and above that provided by a measure of personality. Three of the five dimensions of social axioms were associated with dyadic adjustment, with either actor or partner effects. A few significant differences have been found between the various ethnic groups on effects of the social axioms on dyadic adjustment: The positive actor effect of reward for application is not visible for German men, the negative partner effect of social cynicism is not detectable for Rroma men, and the negative partner effect of social complexity is not visible for Rroma women.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/74898
ISSN: 0890-2070
EISSN: 1099-0984
DOI: 10.1002/per.2131
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