Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/74763
Title: Comparisons of respondent thermal perceptions in underneath-elevated-building (UEB) areas and direct-radiated (DR) areas
Authors: Huang, T 
Niu, J
Mak, CM 
Lin, Z
Issue Date: 2017
Source: Procedia engineering, 2017, v. 205, p. 4165-4171
Abstract: Outdoor activities are believed to provide citizens with various benefits, including stress reduction, livability improvement and energy conservation. Encouraging outdoor activity becomes an effective way to evocate positive emotions. Thus, numerous studies were established to enhance respondent outdoor thermal comfort by investigating landscape design and building morphology. Yet, studies on the outdoor microclimate and thermal comfort in the underneath-elevated-building (UEB) area were scarce. In this study, on-site measurements and questionnaire surveys were conducted from March to December in 2016. Comparisons of meteorological parameters and respondent thermal perceptions between the underneath-elevated-building area and the direct-radiated (DR) area were presented. Results indicated that occupants were more comfortable in UEB area. It appeared that solar radiation and wind speed were two major issues affecting respondent outdoor thermal comfort and highly relative to occupants' thermal sensation, which can be helpful references for urban planners to optimize outdoor microclimates by altering building designs.
Keywords: Direct-radiated area
On-site measurement
Outdoor thermal comfort
Questionnaire survey
Underneath-elevated-building area
Publisher: Elsevier Ltd
Journal: Procedia engineering 
EISSN: 1877-7058
DOI: 10.1016/j.proeng.2017.10.163
Description: 10th International Symposium on Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning, ISHVAC 2017, Jian, China, 19-22 October, 2017
Appears in Collections:Conference Paper

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