Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/71405
Title: Community-based cognitive rehabilitation services for persons with traumatic brain injuries in China
Authors: Dou, ZL 
Man, DWK 
Tam, SF 
Hui-Chan, CWY 
Keywords: Community
Rehabilitation
Cognitive
Brain injury
Issue Date: 2004
Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Source: International journal of rehabilitation research, 2004, v. 27, no. 1, p. 81-84 How to cite?
Journal: International journal of rehabilitation research 
Abstract: The present study aims to explore the need for cognitive rehabilitation services (CRS) in the community for persons with brain injuries and to understand the level of knowledge and attitudes towards cognitive rehabilitation of health care professionals in the city of Guangzhou in southern China, including their use of innovative CRS. One hundred and fifty-five medical and allied health professionals responded to a self-administered questionnaire. Of this number, 128 completed questionnaires were returned; a response rate of 82.58%. Of the respondents, 95.4% agreed with the need to develop CRS in China. They identified four areas as those for which CRS is most urgently needed: language, memory, orientation and attention rehabilitation. The relative appropriateness of settings for such CRS delivery was ranked, from most to least, as the home, hospital and community, respectively. In prioritising the modes of CRS, it was suggested that the order of preference would be face-to-face, computer-assisted and online/web-based. Home-based intervention was also ranked top among the service treatment settings. The respondents also showed a preference for the innovative online mode, which they felt should be conducted in a home rather than a hospital setting.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/71405
ISSN: 0342-5282
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