Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/70525
Title: Constraint-based and dedication-based mechanisms for encouraging online self-disclosure : is personalization the only thing that matters?
Authors: Shih, HP
Lai, KH 
Cheng, TCE 
Keywords: Self-disclosure
Constraint-based and dedication-based mechanisms
Social identity theory
Privacy paradox
Social networking sites
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
Source: European journal of information systems, 2017, v. 26, no. 4, p. 432-450 How to cite?
Journal: European journal of information systems 
Abstract: Consumer-generated self-disclosure is better than firm-generated advertising and sales reports in increasing contact opportunities and also more credible for firms to foster alignment with future market expectations. Previous research mostly assesses online self-disclosure from the rational approach of anticipated benefits and privacy risks without considering the "privacy paradox'' phenomenon (users behave contrarily to privacy concern) in social networking sites (SNSs). We develop a theoretical model, grounded in constraint-based (lock-in) and dedication-based (trust-building) mechanisms and social identity theory, to predict online self-disclosure. We test the proposed theoretical model by surveying 395 consumers with participation experience in an online SNS. Different from the rational approach behind personalization, we advance knowledge on how to apply social identity, as well as constraint-based and dedication-based mechanisms, to motivate online self-disclosure induced by consumers. We provide theoretical and practical insights based on our research findings for managing the motivational mechanisms of online self-disclosure.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/70525
ISSN: 0960-085X
EISSN: 1476-9344
DOI: 10.1057/s41303-016-0031-0
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