Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/66131
Title: Effects of homogeneous/heterogeneous water distribution on GPR wave velocity in a soil's wetting and drying process
Authors: Sham, JFC
Lai, WWL 
Leung, CHC
Keywords: GPR wave velocity
Relatively heterogeneous water distribution (RIWD)
Relatively homogeneous water distributions (RHWD)
Soil permittivity
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Source: Proceedings of 2016 16th International Conference of Ground Penetrating Radar, GPR 2016, 2016, 7572693 How to cite?
Abstract: This paper studies the effects of relatively homogeneous (RHWD) and relatively inhomogeneous water distributions (RIWD) in soil compared by varying the water content through a wetting and drying cycle in a tank (1.85m long × 1.55m wide × 1m deep) filled with 750mm thick plant soil. During the cycle, a 900MHz antenna was regularly used to capture GPR radargrams on a buried steel pipe. Hyperbolic reflections of a buried pipe at a fixed position were extracted to measure wave velocities/dielectric constants at different RHWD and RIWD in the wetting and drying cycle. A vertical coaxial-based water content sensor was also installed in a vertical standpipe in the middle of the tank to obtain the vertical water content profile, synchronized with and correlated to the GPR wave velocity/dielectric constant of the soil. The result of cross plotting between the dielectric constant and soil water content shows that the volumetric fraction of water in a porous medium is the sole important factor affecting dielectric properties of soil.
Description: 16th International Conference of Ground Penetrating Radar, GPR 2016, Hong Kong, 13-16 June 2016
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/66131
ISBN: 9781509051816
DOI: 10.1109/ICGPR.2016.7572693
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