Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/65542
Title: Spatial variation and provenance of atmospheric trace elemental deposition in Beijing
Authors: Zheng, X
Guo, X
Zhao, W
Shu, T
Xin, Y
Yan, X
Xiong, Q
Chen, F
Lv, M
Keywords: Dry deposition
Heavy metals
Lanthanoid elements
Source apportionment
Spatial analysis
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Elsevier
Source: Atmospheric pollution research, 2016, v. 7, no. 2, p. 260-267 How to cite?
Journal: Atmospheric pollution research 
Abstract: Atmospheric dry deposition samples were collected in urban and suburban areas of Beijing during a coal-burning period. Chemical characteristics of lanthanoid elements (La–Lu) and five heavy metals (Cr, Co, Mo, Cd, and Pb) were analyzed to determine the variation in spatial scale and deposition provenances. Factor analysis and ternary diagrams were used to identify principle pollution sources. The LaCeSm ternary diagram was used to identify oil refineries using fluid catalytic converters and steel plants, but could not differentiate crustal materials. Lanthanoid characteristic parameters showed similarity between deposition and soil in the local and southwest area in the vicinity of Beijing. Analysis of the five heavy metals enabled discrimination of contaminants originating from human activities. Cd, Pb, and Mo were found to originate from vehicular traffic, whereas Co and Cr originated from industrial emissions and coal combustion. Discriminant analysis established the causes of spatial variation. The result shows that Co, Mo, and Pb can mark the differences between urban and suburban sites. From the PbMoCo plot, it was inferred that the different chemical characters are mainly due to the differing origins of depositions. Deposition samples in suburban areas are principally influenced by soil, chimney soot, and fertilizer, whereas those in urban area are mainly affected by traffic emissions.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/65542
ISSN: 1309-1042
DOI: 10.1016/j.apr.2015.10.006
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