Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/65225
Title: Impact of information presentation on the users' intention to explore business intelligence system
Authors: Yang, Junyi
Advisors: Hsieh, Po-an JJ (MM)
Keywords: Business intelligence.
User interfaces (Computer systems)
Information visualization.
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Abstract: Business intelligence system (BIS) is rated as one of the most significant technologies for organizations. Many organizations have invested in BIS implementation to support their data analysis and decision making. Despite organizations' tremendous investments in BIS, employees within the organizations are reported to encounter a number of challenges when using BIS, such as complexity in utilizing the system functions, and difficulty in finding relevant data sets, and using only limited number of functions available in BIS. Information presentations of BIS are likely to facilitate the users' information processing and thus improve the users' decision making and usage experience. However, our understanding about the influence of information presentation on BIS implementation remains limited. Hence this study aims to examine how information presentation affects the extent to which users are willing to explore BIS functions. Given that information presentation plays an important role in the initial use of systems, this study theorizes at the pre-adoptive stage of information systems (IS) implementation, and examines the effect of information presentation on the users' intention to explore BIS functions. Drawing upon the cognitive fit theory, I proposed a research model to elaborate how the interaction between information presentation (i.e., text-based or visual) and task type (i.e., symbolic or spatial) could affect the users' intention to explore BIS functions. Drawing on the theoretical perspective of regulatory compatibility, I proposed that the interaction between style of processing (i.e., visual or verbal) and information presentation might also affect users' intention to explore BIS. Synthesizing the above, I further proposed a 3-way interactive effect of information presentation, task type and style of processing on users' intention to explore BIS functions.
I tested the research model and associated hypotheses through a lab experiment with 297 subjects. The results showed that, as expected, (1) the 2-way interaction of information presentation and task type and (2) the 3-way interactive effect of information presentation, task type, and style of processing both influenced users' intention to explore BIS functions. However, these two interaction effects were fully mediated by (i) perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use and (ii) perceived usefulness, respectively. I further found (a) the 3-way interactive effect of information presentation and task type on users' task performance and task time, (b) the 3-way interactive effect of information presentation and style of processing on users' task time, and (c) the 3-way interactive effect on task time. Finally, I also found that the information presentation directly affected users' intention to explore BIS functions, as well as indirectly through perceive usefulness and perceived ease of use. In other words, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use partially mediated the influence of information presentation on BIS exploration intention. This study makes several contributions to both theory and practice. This study examines how technology attribute (i.e., information presentation), task factor (i.e., task type), and user characteristics (i.e., style of processing) jointly affect users' intention to explore BIS from both the theoretical lens of cognitive fit and regulatory compatibility. It extends the traditional cognitive fit research in the IS field (Vessey 1991; Vessey and Galletta 1991) and is, to our best knowledge, the first study that applies regulatory compatibility in the IS field. As for practice, the results of this study suggest that managers should take into account the congruence of information presentations, task types, and style of processing in order to encourage their employees to better explore rich functions available in BIS, thereby attaining the expected outcomes.
Description: PolyU Library Call No.: [THS] LG51 .H577M MM 2015 Yang
159 pages :illustrations
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/65225
Rights: All rights reserved.
Appears in Collections:Thesis

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