Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/62438
Title: Changes in body weight from young adulthood to middle age and its association with blood pressure and hypertension : a cross-sectional study in Hong Kong Chinese women
Authors: Xie, YJ 
Ho, SC
Su, X
Liu, ZM
Keywords: Blood pressure
Epidemiology
Hypertension
Obesity
Women
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Wiley Blackwell
Source: Journal of the American Heart Association, 2016, v. 5, no. 1, e002361 How to cite?
Journal: Journal of the American Heart Association 
Abstract: Background-Few studies have examined the associations of weight changes from young adulthood to middle age with blood pressure (BP) and hypertension among Hong Kong Chinese women.
Methods and Results-Weight at age 18 (W-18), current weight (W-current), height, BP, demographics, and lifestyle factors were obtained from 1253 female nurses (35-65 years) by a self-administered questionnaire through mail survey in Hong Kong. The conditional relative weight (CRW; a residual of W-current regressed on W-18) was used to express the relative weight change from age 18 to current age. The study results show that from young adulthood to middle age, 76.9%, 15.1%, and 8.0% of women had weight gain, weight loss, and stable weight, respectively. Women in the weight loss group had heavier W-18 than those in the weight gain group (P<0.05). Higher weight gain was associated with higher BP (P for trend <0.01). Women who belonged to the heaviest 10% both at age 18 and at present had highest BP than women in other weight categories. By giving W-18, a 1-kg increase in weight change predicted 0.63 and 0.42 mm Hg increases in systolic and diastolic BP, respectively (both P<0.001) and 12% greater odds of being hypertension (95% confidence interval, 1.08, 1.17). The CRW was positively associated with BP and hypertension; no interaction was found between CRW and W-current on BP/hypertension.
Conclusions-A majority of Chinese women tended to become heavier throughout adult life. More weight gain led to the higher BP. Weight change is an independent predictor for later-life BP and hypertension.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/62438
ISSN: 2047-9980
DOI: 10.1161/JAHA.115.002361
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