Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/62429
Title: Desire for experiential travel, avoidance of rituality and social esteem : an empirical study of consumer response to tourism innovation
Authors: Chan, WY
To, CKM 
Chu, WC 
Keywords: Tourism
Consumption
Possessions
Social esteem
Uniqueness
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Source: Journal of innovation & knowledge, 2016, v. 1, no. 1, p. 24-35 How to cite?
Journal: Journal of innovation & knowledge 
Abstract: This study investigates tourist consumption responses toward tourism innovation. To measure tourist responses, this study posits three key consumption drivers, namely social esteem, desire for experiential travel, and avoidance against rituality of tourism settings (a subscale of need for uniqueness) and models consumers' affective response within the context of tourism innovation. It involves 295 respondents in an empirical survey. The findings affirm the three drivers toward tourist consumption behavior. Avoidance of rituality reflects tourist preference toward tourism product and service innovation. Desire for experiential travel and the pursuit of social esteem signify tourism management and marketing innovation. Social esteem, need for status and creative choice have significant influence on tourists' affective responses. Acquiring unique tourist products, desire for experiential travel and seeking social esteem are important motivations for tourist consumption. The implications of the study enrich the existing literature of consumer behavior and tourist consumption in response to tourism innovation.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/62429
ISSN: 2444-569X
DOI: 10.1016/j.jik.2016.02.001
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