Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/62337
Title: Organic acids in cloud water and rainwater at a mountain site in acid rain areas of South China
Authors: Sun, X
Wang, Y
Li, H
Yang, X
Sun, L
Wang, X
Wang, T 
Wang, W
Keywords: Organic acids
Cloudwater
Rainwater
Sources
Mount Lu
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Springer
Source: Environmental science and pollution research, 2016, v. 23, no. 10, p. 9529-9539 How to cite?
Journal: Environmental science and pollution research 
Abstract: To investigate the chemical characteristics of organic acids and to identify their source, cloud water and rainwater samples were collected at Mount Lu, a mountain site located in the acid rain-affected area of south China, from August to September of 2011 and March to May of 2012. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentration of organic acids in cloud water was 38.42 mu eq/L, ranging from 7.45 to 111.46 mu eq/L, contributing to 2.50 % of acidity. In rainwater samples, organic acid concentrations varied from 12.39 to 68.97 mu eq/L (VWM of 33.39 mu eq/L). Organic acids contributed significant acidity to rainwater, with a value of 17.66 %. Formic acid, acetic acid, and oxalic acid were the most common organic acids in both cloud water and rainwater. Organic acids had an obviously higher concentration in summer than in spring in cloud water, whereas there was much less discrimination in rainwater between the two seasons. The contribution of organic acids to acidity was lower during summer than during spring in both cloud water (2.20 % in summer vs 2.83 % in spring) and rainwater (12.24 % in summer vs 19.89 % in spring). The formic-to-acetic acid ratio (F/A) showed that organic acids were dominated by primary emissions in 71.31 % of the cloud water samples and whole rainwater samples. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis determined four factors as the sources of organic acids in cloud water, including biogenic emissions (61.8 %), anthropogenic emissions (15.28 %), marine emissions (15.07 %) and soil emissions (7.85 %). The findings from this study imply an indispensable role of organic acids in wet deposition, but organic acids may have a limited capacity to increase ecological risks in local environments.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/62337
ISSN: 0944-1344
EISSN: 1614-7499
DOI: 10.1007/s11356-016-6038-1
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