Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/62194
Title: Increased cognitive control during execution of finger tap movement in people with Parkinson's Disease
Authors: Mak, MKY 
Cheung, V
Ma, S
Lu, ZL
Wang, D
Lou, W
Shi, L
Mok, VCT
Chu, WCW
Hallett, M
Keywords: Cerebellum
Cognition
FMRI
Movement disorders
Parkinson s disease
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: IOS Press
Source: Journal of Parkinson's disease, 2016, v. 6, no. 3, p. 639-650 How to cite?
Journal: Journal of Parkinson's disease 
Abstract: Background: Previous studies employed demanding and complex hand tasks to study the brain activation in people with Parkinson s Disease (PD). There is inconsistent finding about the cerebellar activity during movement execution of this patient population. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the brain activation patterns of PD individuals in the on-state and healthy control subjects in a simple finger tapping task.
Methods: Twenty-seven patients with PD and 22 age-matched healthy subjects were recruited for the study. Subjects were instructed to perform simple finger tapping tasks under self- and cue-initiated conditions in separate runs while their brain activations were captured using fMRI.
Results: Healthy subjects had higher brain activity in contralateral precentral gyrus during the self-initiated task, and higher brain activity in the ipsilateral middle occipital gyrus during the cue-initiated task. PD patients had higher brain activity in the cerebellum Crus I (bilateral) and lobules VI (ipsilateral) during the self-initiated task and higher brain activity in the contralateral middle frontal gyrus during the cue-initiated task. When compared with healthy controls, PD patients had lower brain activity in the contralateral inferior parietal lobule during the self-initiated task, and lower brain activity in the ipsilateral cerebellum lobule VIII, lobule VIIB and vermis VIII, and thalamus during the cue-initiated task. Conjunction analysis indicated that both groups had activation in bilateral cerebellum and SMA and ipsilateral precentral gyrus and postcentral gyrus during both self- and cue-initiated movement. Individuals with PD exhibited higher brain activity in the executive zone (cerebellum Crus I and II) during self-initiated movement, and lower brain activity in the sensorimotor zone (i.e. lobule VIIb and VIII of the cerebellum) during cue-initiated movement.
Discussions: The findings suggest that individuals with PD may use more executive control when performing simple movements.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/62194
ISSN: 1877-7171
EISSN: 1877-718X
DOI: 10.3233/JPD-160849
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