Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/60791
Title: Self-determination of young adults with mental handicap
Authors: Li, EPY
Keywords: Cultural exclusion
Body
Dress
Work
Race
Ethnicity
Issue Date: 2000
Publisher: Mental Health Association of Hong Kong
Source: Hong Kong journal of mental health, 2000, v. 29, no. 1, p. 77-104 How to cite?
Journal: Hong Kong journal of mental health 
Abstract: Despite the need to promote self-determination for people with mental handicap, little is known about the control and choice making in the life of these people in Hong Kong. The purpose of this study was to explore the decision making regarding employment of people with mental handicap. An opportunity sample of 29 adults with mild mental handicap (mean age: 22.6 years) participated in in-depth interviews. Content analysis and a constant comparative method were adopted to interpret the data. Findings from this study indicated that all of the participants were willing to take up employment and two-thirds of them were capable of articulating job preferences. Almost half of the 21 participants who had completed vocational training had taken vocational training programmes unrelated to their job preferences and six of them were negative towards their vocational training experience. Half of the 26 participants who had a job in the community were not able to get the jobs that they preferred and four of them expressed that they did not like their present jobs. The findings suggested that these participants had the intellectual capacity to make goal-directed decisions. About two-thirds of the participants Simplifiedly accepted the job placements arranged by vocational services and/or their families and thus might not be involved in making decisions regarding employment. By contrast, one-third of the participants demonstrated their effort in obtaining jobs that they preferred, and they displayed self-determined behaviour. The need to empower people with mental handicap to take up self-determined roles is discussed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/60791
ISSN: 1560-9294
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