Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/60784
Title: Finite element analysis of contact pressures between seat cushion and human buttock-thigh tissue
Authors: Tang, CY 
Chan, W
Tsui, CP 
Issue Date: 2010
Publisher: Scientific Research
Source: Engineering, 2010, v. 2, no. 9, p. 720-726 How to cite?
Journal: Engineering 
Abstract: Unrelieved pressure on load-bearing muscle tissues of humans can produce pressure ulcers. In a seated upright posture, the highest pressures occur inferior to the ischial tuberosities (ITs). Moreover, the vibration can initiate the development of pressure ulcer. Therefore, the seat cushion is not only used to lower the maximum seating pressure on buttocks but also minimize the transmission of vibration to human body. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of varying vertical vibration frequencies on seat-interface contact pressure during sitting on three different seat cushions by using a finite element modeling approach. A simplified two-dimensional human buttock-thigh model was developed to simulate the mechanical response of the muscle of buttocks and thigh under vertical vibration. Static and vibrational loads with five different frequencies of 0.1, 1, 10, 30 and 50 Hz and the same amplitude of 3 mm were applied to different seat cushions. The result showed that the “SAF 6060” seat cushion with both hyperelastic and viscoelastic behaviors could be effective in reducing the amplitude of varying maximum contact pressure, especially for the frequency of 10-20 Hz. This method could help in design of seat cushions with appropriate material properties and shape so as to reduce vibrations transmitted to human body at a certain frequency range.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/60784
ISSN: 1947-3931
EISSN: 1947-394X
DOI: 10.4236/eng.2010.29093
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

Page view(s)

21
Last Week
1
Last month
Checked on Dec 11, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.