Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/55807
Title: Dressing behavior of construction workers in hot and humid weather
Authors: Chan, PC 
Yang, Y
Wong, KW 
Yam, CHM 
Keywords: Construction workers
Dressing behavior
Current dressing patterns
Work clothing
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: IOS Press
Source: Occupational ergonomics, 2013, v. 11, no. 4, p. 177-186 How to cite?
Journal: Occupational ergonomics 
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Construction workers in Hong Kong face high health risks of heat stress, solar ultraviolet radiation, and hazardous substances. A suitable work wear can lower exposure to these hazards, but the actual dressing behavior of construction workers remains unknown.
OBJECTIVE: Thisstudy examines the current dressing patterns of construction workers and evaluates their limitations.
METHODS: The dressing patterns of construction workers were investigated through unconcealed videotaped observation and questionnaire survey to enhance the reliability and validity of this research.
RESULTS: Results indicate that construction workers were willing to wear short-sleeved shirts for a cooler feeling, although such dressing patterns may not protect them against solar ultraviolet radiation or hazardous substances. Their preferred dark-colored long pants can decrease the direct exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation and hazardous substances, but they absorb a large amount of radiation heat that increases the hazards of heat stress to the wearers.
CONCLUSIONS: Thermal-related attributes were the most significant concerns of construction workers, which serve as key elements for designing appropriate work clothes for construction workers.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/55807
ISSN: 1359-9364
EISSN: 1875-9092
DOI: 10.3233/OER-140217
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