Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/55411
Title: Empirical modeling of the impacts of faults on water-cooled chiller power consumption for use in building simulation programs
Authors: Cheung, H
Braun, JE
Keywords: Building simulation
Chiller
Empirical model
Fault
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Pergamon Press
Source: Applied thermal engineering, 2016, v. 99, p. 756-764 How to cite?
Journal: Applied thermal engineering 
Abstract: Empirical models of four chiller faults that can be applied within existing building models to study overall impacts are developed in this paper. The faults include overcharging, excess oil, non-condensables in refrigerant and water-side condenser fouling. A single generalized model structured was developed for these faults that forces predicted fault impacts to be zero with no fault and increase with increasing fault level. The models were trained and tested using available laboratory data for a water-cooled centrifugal chiller where all four faults were artificially introduced. The fault model behavior was studied and then they were integrated in hospital models from DOE commercial reference building models (Deru et al., 2011) and simulations were performed in different climates. The simulation results showed maximum increases of building electricity consumption, electricity peak demand and water consumption of the hospitals due to faults of 4.7%, 7.8% and 1.8% respectively. The fault impacts were found to be more severe in hotter and more humid climates.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/55411
ISSN: 1359-4311
EISSN: 1873-5606
DOI: 10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2016.01.119
Appears in Collections:Journal/Magazine Article

Access
View full-text via PolyU eLinks SFX Query
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

2
Last Week
0
Last month
Citations as of Oct 9, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

3
Last Week
0
Last month
Citations as of Oct 17, 2017

Page view(s)

26
Last Week
0
Last month
Checked on Oct 15, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.