Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/55182
Title: Measurement of the layered compressive properties of trypsintreated articular cartilage: An ultrasound investigation
Authors: Zheng, YP 
Ding, CX
Bai, J
Mak, AFT
Qin, L
Keywords: Articular cartilage
Biomechanics
Elastography
Osteoarthritis
Ultrasound technique
Issue Date: 2001
Publisher: Springer
Source: Medical and biological engineering and computing, 2001, v. 39, no. 5p. 534-541 How to cite?
Journal: Medical and biological engineering and computing 
Abstract: An ultrasound-compression system has been developed for the study of the layered biomechanical properties of articular cartilage. Cartilage specimens harvested from the bovine patella groove, with and without trypsin digestion, were tested using this system. It was noted that a large ultrasound reflection can be detected in the interface of the trypsin digestion front. This ultrasound reflection signal was used to differentiate the deformations of different portions of the cartilage throughout its depth when a load was applied. The equilibrium compression moduli of the digested, undigested and entire portions of articular cartilage were measured. The modulus of the cartilage without any digestion was 660±230kPa. After 1h digestion with 1 mg ml−1 trypsin solution, the thickness of the digested portion was 0.50±0.06 mm, and the modulus of the entire cartilage layer changed to 125±42 kPa. The moduli of the digested and undigested portions were 58±24 kPa and 470±31 kPa, respectively. Similar results were obtained for the cartilage with trypsin digestion for 2 h.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/55182
ISSN: 0140-0118
EISSN: 1741-0444
DOI: 10.1007/BF02345143
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