Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/54966
Title: Integrating economic and social policy through the Singapore housing system
Authors: Lee, J 
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
Source: In J Doling & R Ronald (Eds.), Housing East Asia : socioeconomic and demographic challenges, p. 162-179. Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014 How to cite?
Abstract: For those interested in East Asian development states, one question continues to attract much attention: what has made the remarkable growth of Singapore sustainable thus far? Singapore has an average GDP growth rate of 6.36 per cent, a per capita GDP of US$32,573 and a current account surplus of US$11,853 million in 2011 (Trading Economics, 2012a). This level of economic progress has put Singapore on the top of many international scoreboards. The 2011 Index of Economic Freedom ranks Singapore as the freest economy in the world after Hong Kong. More importantly, Singapore tops the four East Asia tiger states in terms of health care and education provisions. Building on a sound economic foundation, Singapore has developed into a regional medical tourism centre and a higher education hub, with universities like Yale and Duke forming close collaborations with Singapore universities. Lee Kuan Yew, first prime minister and father of the modern Singaporean state, as well as the new leadership, pride themselves on having established a social democracy in the East. While many would disagree with this claim, in the development literature Singapore has always been portrayed as a unique developmental state in East Asia with non-traditional institutions and social arrangements having little theoretical relevance for other countries in terms of governance (Huff, 1995). This mindset has successfully deterred the quest for a more general conceptual understanding of the implications and relevance of the Singapore experience on understanding social policy and social development in East Asia.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/54966
ISBN: 9780230358584
9781137314529 (e-book)
DOI: 10.1057/9781137314529_8
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