Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/44123
Title: Preparation and characterization of in situ polymerized cyclic butylene terephthalate and its composites
Authors: Zhang, L
Zhou, LM 
Zhang, JF
Yang, B
Fan, SH
Keywords: Crystallization
Cyclic butylene terephthalate
Mechanical properties
Poly(cyclic butylene terephthalate)
Rheology
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Trans Tech Publications Ltd
Source: Materials science forum, 2015, v. 813, p. 258-264 How to cite?
Journal: Materials science forum 
Abstract: A fatal disadvantage of continuously reinforced thermoplastic composites is the high melt viscosity of the matrix which hampers impregnation. However, the melt viscosity of low molecular weight CBT resin can reach extremely low value, which simplifies impregnation and enables the use of thermoset production methods. The thermal analysis, rheological analysis and mechanical property on the polymerization and crystallization of CBT into poly (cyclic butylene terephthalate) (PCBT) at different ratios of catalyst were investigated in this paper. The continuous glass fiber (GF) reinforced PCBT composite with over 70% fiber volume content was prepared via in situ polymerization, and the mechanical property of the PCBT was studied. The best impregnation time was decreased and the degree of crystallinity was increased respectively with catalyst fraction increasing. The tensile/flexural strength and modulus of PCBT resin and GF/PCBT composites were enhanced when the catalyst fraction increased from 0.3% to 0.6%.
Description: 1st International Conference on Advanced Composites for Marine Engineering, ICACME 2013, 10-12 September 2013
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10397/44123
ISBN: 978-3038354062
ISSN: 0255-5476
EISSN: 1662-9752
DOI: 10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.813.258
Appears in Collections:Conference Paper

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